You are here: Home

Meetings and Field Trips

You are welcome to attend monthly meetings, featuring speakers on birding and natural history topics, and including a delicious member-provided evening meal -- with desserts! Our monthly field trips are fun and educational, and focus on locations along the coast, marshes, prairies, and forests of the area.


Annual Meeting and Pot-luck Dinner
Thursday November 20, 2014  7:00 p.m.
Garden Center, Tyrrell Park, Beaumont 

 

Thanks to Kay and Travis Lovelace of the Friends of Anahuac Refuge, we have a two part program. Following the main part of the program about Anahuac NWR, we will have a brief presentation of a new citizen science program focusing on Texas colonial waterbirds.

 

David Sarkozi, Friends of Anahuac Refuge
Winter and Spring Birding at Anahuac NWR

 

Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge is one of the premier birding locations on the Upper Texas Coast. More than 320 species have been documented on the 35,000 acres of the refuge. With a mix of small woodlands, stands of native prairie, rice field, brackish and salt marshes, the birds of Anahuac NWR are as varied as the habitat. Thirty species of waterfowl, 16 species of raptors, and 37 species of warblers have been recorded. Learn what to expect and where to look for the best birds at Anahuac NWR.

 

Kari Howard
Audubon Texas Coastal Conservation Program
Texas Estuarine Resource Network

 

Audubon Texas Coastal Conservation Program has launched the citizen science and stewardship program, Texas Estuarine Resource Network or T.E.R.N. This program offers free training, educational workshops, and stewardship activities to promote awareness among the general public about the importance of colonial waterbird species, issues of conservation concern, and to encourage participation in the protection of colonial waterbird species and their habitats. The primary objective is to develop a network of informed volunteers to become stewards of the Texas Coast through monitoring of waterbirds in foraging and rookery habitats, other wildlife, and their habitats. The data collected through this citizen science program can be incorporated into management and conservation plans, and to influence local, state and federal policy development.

 

Directions to Garden Center in Tyrrell Park
 From the south

Go "north" on US69/96/287 around the south side of Beaumont.

Take Texas 124 (south or west, whichever it is signed) towards Fannett (left turn under the highway).

Travel about a mile to the first light.

At the first light, turn left onto Tyrrell Park Road and go about 1/2 mile.

Turn left into Tyrrell Park through the nice new arch.

Almost immediately turn left at the conservatory into the parking lot for the Garden Center.

 From IH10

Exit at Walden Road on the west side of Beaumont

Go south of Walden Road for about 1/2 mile to the first light

At the light go straight over Highway 124 onto Tyrrell Park Road and go about 1/2 mile.

Turn left into Tyrrell Park through the nice new arch.

Almost immediately turn left at the conservatory into the parking lot for the Garden Center.

 

Saturday November 22
Field Trip to West Jefferson County

The area is well known for its birds of prey, its Sandhill Cranes and its sparrows. In wet years, there can be lots of waterfowl also.

     Meet at 8 a.m. at the intersection of FM365 and Johnson Road (on the “north/west” side of Johnson Road at that intersection). From the intersection of Interstate 10 and FM365 in Fannett, proceed along FM365 (towards Nome) for about six miles. Shortly after you emerge out of the woodlands, South China Road goes to the right (east then north) and immediately afterwards, on the left, is Johnson Road. There is a green sign for the G and A Turf Farm on Johnson Road at the intersection. Contact Steve Mayes, sgmayes @hotmail.com, or call 409-722-5807 for further information. 

 

 

Document Actions
Log in


Forgot your password?